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GOT STUMP TREE LIST

Apple / Crabapple / Ornamental Crabapple

Tricky to work with due to its density, Apple/Crabapple wood is easy to finish, stain, and glue.

  • Color Varies from light to dark red or grayish brown with light and dark bands, sapwood is light cream
  • Texture Straight grain with fine and uniform texture
  • Common Use Fine furniture, carving projects, turned items

Mountain Ash

One of the top ten largest trees in the world in regards to height, girth, and volume.

  • Color Yellow to light brown heartwood with gum and mineral veins being common
  • Texture Straight grain with medium to coarse texture
  • Common Use Plywood, general construction, veneer, and flooring

Green Ash

Considered an invasive species due to its rapid growth and lack of natural predators or parasites.

  • Color Light to medium brown in color with a wide beige sapwood that is not easily identifiable against the heartwood
  • Texture Similar to oak, the texture is coarse and mostly straight
  • Common Use Baseball bats, flooring, turned items, and crates

Schubert Chokecherry

An ornamental tree favored by gardeners and arborists alike, requiring a great deal of kilning.

  • Color With several black knots and bands, light to dark brown sapwood
  • Texture Unpredictable grain, generally coarse in texture
  • Common Use Turned items, firewood, carvings

Amur Cherry

One of the most popular woods for oboes, clarinets, bassoons, and other woodwind instruments, the beauty of this wood makes it highly sought after.

  • Color Light pinkish heartwood when initially cut, but deepens to a rich brown after exposure to air and light
  • Texture Fine to medium texture with a fine, wavy grain
  • Common Use Veneer, carvings, musical instruments, furniture, cabinets

Poplar

The original utility wood, rarely used for its appearance and rather as an inexpensive alternative for unseen structures.

  • Color Light cream sapwood and yellow to brownish heartwood, occasionally stained by minerals found in the environment
  • Texture Uniform grain that is straight and medium in texture
  • Common Use Pallets, crates, frames, hardwood floors, plywood

Columnar Aspen

A strong, inexpensive, and reliable utility wood that is unassuming in color or texture, making it perfect for internal structures and general purpose framing.

  • Color Wide heartwood that is beige in color with pale yellow sapwood
  • Texture Uniform grain that is straight and medium in texture
  • Common Use Boxes, crates, pallets, plywood

Oak

The gold standard for hardwood, this wood tends to be easy to finish, strong, and beautiful.

  • Color With several different varieties of oak, there are several different colors and bandings available, ranging from light pale yellow to deeper and richer brown with uniform and structured streaking and banding
  • Texture Medium to large texture with a coarse grain
  • Common Use Fine furniture, high quality cabinetry, boatbuilding, trim, barrels, veneer

Maple

While most other hardwoods utilize the heartwood, it is the sapwood of the maple that is often used.

  • Color Colors vary widely, from nearly white to a light red
  • Texture Straight grain with occasional wavy patterns, with a fine and even texture
  • Common Use Paper, veneer, boxes, crates, turned items, musical instruments

Elm

Difficult to work with due to its interlocked texture, however, also making it split resistant.

  • Color Light to medium red brown with a light sapwood
  • Texture Difficult and interlocked texture
  • Common Use Boxes, hockey sticks, furniture, pulp, veneer

Birch

One of the single most utilized woods in the world, regularly used for plywood and veneer.

  • Color White sapwood with light reddish-brown heartwood and a uniform appearance
  • Texture Tight pores and a straight grain with a fine texture
  • Common Use Interior trim, crates, boxes, turned items, plywood

Spruce

With a wide variety of spruce available, the versatility of this wood along with its general affordability makes it one of the go-to supplies in construction.

  • Color A light cream color with occasional red banding and sapwood
  • Texture Typically knotty and distinct, the grain is often fine in texture and frequently straight
  • Common Use Sheathing, construction, railroad ties, paper

Pine

A versatile and inexpensive piece of lumber, pine is one of the most reliable and sustainable trees to cultivate, grow, and harvest.

  • Color Clearly demarcated red and brown heartwood and banding, the sapwood tends to be lightish yellow
  • Texture Straight grain with medium and uniform texture
  • Common Use Subflooring, cabinetry, veneer, plywood, sheathing, boxes, crates, poles, trim

Fir

Tricky to work with due to its density, Apple/Crabapple wood is easy to finish, stain, and glue.

  • Color Varies from light to dark red or grayish brown with light and dark bands, sapwood is light cream
  • Texture Straight grain with fine and uniform texture
  • Common Use Fine furniture, carving projects, turned items

Tamarak

This tree derives its name from the Abenaki word for “snowshoes”, and thusly, this tribe used tamarak to construct their snowshoes.

  • Color Heartwood is almost orangish in color with nearly white sapwood that is narrowly banded
  • Texture Occasionally spiraled but often straight grain, texture is medium-fine with a slightly greasy feel
  • Common Use Snowshoes, boxes, crates, rough lumber, utility poles, paper

Larch

Considered the hardest softwood, the larch tree is one of the most frequently utilized species in the lumber industry.

  • Color Heartwood that is light yellow to medium red in color, with a clearly demarcated white sapwood
  • Texture Straight grain with a texture that is medium-course, has an oily feel
  • Common Use Particle board, veneer, paper, construction, flooring

Russian olive

Originally brought to North America for erosion control, this ornamental tree is now considered an invasive species due to its rapid expansion and ability to adapt to varying climates.

  • Color Often possessing a rich, dark, golden brown heartwood with a slight greenish hue
  • Texture Very uneven texture with very large pores
  • Common Use Turned items, bowls, other woodturning projects

Hawthorn

Utilized for culinary and medicinal purposes, the hawthorn tree is often utilized for bonsai.

  • Color Golden yellow heartwood with deep, rich, and tight sapwood
  • Texture Occasionally spiraled but often straight grain, texture is medium-fine
  • Common Use Tool handles, carving projects, turned items

Linden

An ideal wood for carving and turning projects, this tree is known for its outstanding strength-to-weight ratio.

  • Color Pale in color, ranging from cream to light yellow and very subtle growth rings
  • Texture Straight grain with fine and uniform texture
  • Common Use Cutting boards, veneer, plywood, musical instruments, carving projects, turned items

Ohio Buckeye

Easily one of the lightest and softest hardwoods and along with its plain appearance, the Ohio Buckeye is primarily used for utility purposes.

  • Color Light creamy white to yellow and not demarcated from the white sapwood, occasional grey streaks
  • Texture Straight grain with fine and even texture, occasionally interlocked
  • Common Use Fine furniture, boxes, paper, guitar tops, carving projects, turned items

Willow

With literally hundreds of species in the willow, there is a wide range of strengths, weights, and textures to this tree, leading it to be a very versatile lumber.

  • Color Typically the heartwood is a reddish to grayish brown with dark streaks and banding, sapwood is generally tan to white
  • Texture Interlocked grain with a medium-fine texture
  • Common Use Baskets, crates, boxes, carvings, turned items, utility wood

Caragana

Another tree brought from Asia for erosion protection and wind barriers, however, the wide spread of the caragana has resulted in it being considered an invasive species.

  • Color Light sapwood is generally contrasted with deep, dark, brown heartwood
  • Texture Straight grain with fine and uniform texture
  • Common Use Small woodworking projects, turned items, bowls, pens